Palm Sunday: Christ’s Kingship

In today’s first Gospel, we reenact our Lord’s triumphant entry into Jerusalem, when he rides in triumphantly, seated on a donkey. This was foreshadowed when David had his son Solomon mount his royal donkey and ride into Jerusalem to take possession of his kingship. So now God the Father has his Son mount a donkey so as to ride into Jerusalem to take possession of his eternal kingship. Also this would fulfill the prophecy of Zechariah: “Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter of Jerusalem! Lo, your king comes to you; triumphant and victorious is he, humble and riding on an ass, on a colt the foal of an ass” (Zechariah 9:9).

St. Josemaría loved this scene of the Gospel, where Christ manifests his humility by riding the gentle donkey. He would imagine himself as that beast of burden, offering his King the use of his life and strength: “If Jesus’ reign in my soul, in your soul, meant that he should find it a perfect dwelling place, then indeed would we have reason to despair. But ‘fear not, daughter of Sion; beloved, your king is coming, sitting on an ass’ colt’ (John 12:15). Don’t you see? Jesus makes do with a poor animal for a throne. I don’t know about you; but I am not humiliated to acknowledge that in the Lord’s eyes I am a beast of burden: ‘I am like a donkey in your presence, but I am continually with you. You hold my right hand’ (Psalm 72:23), you take me by the bridle” (Christ Is Passing By, 181). Let’s let Christ reign over us through our work and study, in our friendships and family relationships. Christ reigns by offering him our life in service, just as did that donkey for Christ.

The second Gospel—the Passion of our Lord—also is about Christ’s kingship. Christ marches into Jerusalem in order to be enthroned on the Cross. As St. Josemaría writes in the Way of the Cross:

“Sentence is about to be passed. Mockingly, Pilate says: Ecce rex vester! Behold your king! (John 19:14). Infuriated, the chief priests reply: We have no king but Caesar (John 19:15)… Offering no resistance, Jesus gives himself up to the execution of the sentence. He is to be spared nothing, and upon his shoulders falls the weight of the ignominious cross. But, through love, the Cross becomes the throne from which he reigns…

“Lord, where are your friends? Your subjects, where are they? They have left you. This running away has been going on for twenty centuries… We, all of us, flee from the Cross, from your Holy Cross.

“Blood, anguish, loneliness and an insatiable hunger for souls… these are the courtiers around your royal throne” (From station 1, meditation 4 and station 2)

 

Have a Blessed Holy Week!

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